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Abraham Lincoln

Description:

Carte de visite portrait of Abraham Lincoln (seated at desk, in profile). Signed "A. Lincoln" on bottom front. On verso: "I certify that the President's signature is genuine.(s) John Hay, Also - Theodore Roosevelt's handwriting, "Given to father by / President Lincoln; by / father to Aunt Annie; / now to me by Uncle Jimmie / May 1902/ (s) Theodore Roosevelt.

Resource Type: Photograph

Subject: Presidents--Portraits; Hay, John, 1838-1905; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865

Date: 1861-05-16?

Abraham Lincoln's Funeral Procession

Description:

View of Abraham Lincoln's funeral procession, showing the home of Cornelius Van Schaack Roosevelt at the corner of Broadway and Union Square in New York. Two children are visible in the second story window, one of whom is Theodore Roosevelt, the other is his brother Elliott Roosevelt.

Resource Type: Photograph

Subject: Presidents--Death; Funeral journey of Abraham Lincoln to Springfield; New York (State)--New York; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919; Roosevelt, Elliott, 1860-1894; Roosevelt, Cornelius Van Schaack, 1794-1871; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865

Date: 1865-04-25

John A. Logan in 1859

Description:

John Alexander Logan stands at center, holding a paper that states "No Interference with Slave-Hunters!" and looking over his left shoulder at two slave hunters rounding up a family of fugitive slaves. A similar scene is repeated in the background. Abraham Lincoln, William H. Seward, and Charles Sumner are standing on the left, watching in anger and with restraint. Caption: "You call it the dirty work of the Democratic Party to catch fugitive slaves for the Southern people. WE are willing to perform that dirty work." --John Alexander Logan, in the Illinois State Legislature, Dec. 9th, 1859.

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: African Americans--Civil rights; Fugitive slaves; Bounty hunters; Logan, John Alexander, 1826-1886; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872; Sumner, Charles, 1811-1874

Date: 1884-07-09

The honor of the country in danger

Description:

Illustration shows the spirits of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln looking at a throne draped with an American flag beneath a sign that states, "This coming term will end the first hundred years of the American presidency. Shall the century begun with Washington at the head of government end in disgrace with James G. Blaine in that sacred chair?" Below is Blaine, tattooed with scandals and frightened by the shades of past presidents, his hat labeled "Corruption" falling off, with his foot on the first step toward the presidency. Leaning against his back is Jay Gould holding a paper that states "Four Supreme Court judges to be appointed by the next president," also behind Blaine, on his hands and knees, is Stephen W. Dorsey, next to a paper on the floor that states, "Honesty No Requisite for the Presidency (Blaine's Theory)," and on the right stands Benjamin F. Butler as a court jester labeled "Barcain with Blaine."

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: Presidents--Elections; Corruption; Scandals; Fools and jesters; Blaine, James Gillespie, 1830-1893; Gould, Jay, 1836-1892; Washington, George, 1732-1799; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Dorsey, Stephen Wallace, 1842-1916; Butler, Benjamin F. (Benjamin Franklin), 1818-1893

Date: 1884-10-29

A great past and a pitiful present

Description:

Illustration shows Whitelaw Reid, John Sherman, George F. Hoar, and John Logan lifting Uncle Sam above a swamp filled with several faces of corruption labeled "Blainism, Robesonism, Mahone Repudiation, Land Grab, Whiskey Ring, Rotten Ships, Pension Swindle, Fraud 1876, Star Routers, Salary Grab, Army Ring, [and] Sectional Issue" with Reid gesturing toward a statue in the upper left that shows General Robert E. Lee surrendering to General Ulysses S. Grant and Admiral David G. Farragut at the base of a statue showing Abraham Lincoln issuing the Emancipation Proclamation and a slave freed from bondage. Caption: Uncle Sam - "It's no use lifting me up to look at your monumental record, gentlemen; what can you give me to stand on now!"

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: American Civil War (1861-1865); Uncle Sam (Symbolic character); Sectionalism (United States); Political corruption; Wetlands; Public officers; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Grant, Ulysses S. (Ulysses Simpson), 1822-1885; Lee, Robert E. (Robert Edward), 1807-1870; Reid, Whitelaw, 1837-1912; Hoar, George Frisbie, 1826-1904; Sherman, John, 1823-1900; Logan, John Alexander, 1826-1886; Blaine, James Gillespie, 1830-1893; Robeson, George M. (George Maxwell), 1829-1897; Farragut, David Glasgow, 1801-1870; Mahone, William, 1826-1895

Date: 1885-10-28

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to John Torrey Morse

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt compliments author John Torrey Morse on his biographical publications on Abraham Lincoln and George Washington, making notes of specific details he enjoyed.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Authors; Presidents; American literature--Biography; Compliments; Books and reading; Washington, George, 1732-1799; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865

Date: 1893-05-05

American Ideals

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt writes of the importance of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln in American history. Original title of the article was "True American Ideals."

Resource Type: Magazine article

Subject: Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Washington, George, 1732-1799

Date: 1895-02

History repeats itself

Description:

At center, William Jennings Bryan, labeled "16 to 1," stands on a platform "Built by Popo. Platform Silver Syndicate" and holds up a paper that states, "'We Denounce Arbitrary Interference by Federal Authorities, in Local Affairs, as a Violation of the Constitution,' etc., W.J. Bryan." On the right, labeled "1861," Jefferson Davis holds a paper that states, "'We Denounce Arbitrary Interference by Federal Authorities, in Local Affairs, as a Violation of the Constitution,' etc., Jeff. Davis." Davis confronts Abraham Lincoln who is holding a copy of the "Constitution of U.S." The bombing of "Fort Sumter" is taking place behind them. On the left, labeled "1896," Benjamin R. Tillman, John P. Altgeld, Eugene V. Debs, and John P. Jones are standing on a torn American flag labeled "National Honor" and raising a new flag labeled "Dis-Order and Mis-Rule."

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: American Civil War (1861-1865); Presidents--Election; Political parties--Platforms; Silver question; Pressure groups; Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925; Tillman, Benjamin R. (Benjamin Ryan), 1847-1918; Altgeld, John Peter, 1847-1902; Debs, Eugene V. (Eugene Victor), 1855-1926; Jones, John P. (John Percival), 1829-1912; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Davis, Jefferson, 1808-1889

Date: 1896-10-28

Speech given by Theodore Roosevelt at Grand Rapids, Michigan

Description:

In a speech given in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Vice Presidential candidate Roosevelt emphasizes the successes of the current McKinley administration.  He criticizes free silver and the platform of William Jennings Bryan.  Roosevelt asserts that a stable currency is the most important factor in sustaining the prosperity of the nation.  Roosevelt also discusses the issue of trusts and industry, the ongoing war in the Philippines, and compares the current campaign to that of 1864 when Abraham Lincoln was re-elected.

Resource Type: Speech

Subject: Spanish-American War (1898); Philippine American War (Philippines : 1899-1902); Speeches, addresses, etc.; Industrial relations; Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925; McKinley, William, 1843-1901; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865

Date: 1900-09-07

Speech of Gov. Roosevelt at St. Louis, Monday night, Oct. 9, 1900

Description:

Draft of a speech with handwritten corrections. Governor Roosevelt campaigns against William Jennings Bryan and his policies. Bryan's prophecies regarding the need for free silver have not come true and the country has prospered. Roosevelt advocates national action to combat the complex problems of trusts. He points out the plight of African Americans and that Bryan seems more concerned with the rights of the "bandits" in the Philippines. Roosevelt doesn't want the United States to shirk their duty in the Philippines and believes that liberty will come to the islands under the American flag.

Resource Type: Speech

Subject: American Civil War (1861-1865); Philippine American War (Philippines : 1899-1902); Campaign speeches; Silver question; Bimetallism; Trusts, Industrial--Government policy; Business and politics; Constitutional amendments; African Americans--Civil rights; Imperialism--Moral and ethical aspects; Liberty; Philippines; Switzerland; Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Aguinaldo, Emilio, 1869-1964

Date: 1900-10-09?

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